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About Consilium

Consilium Academies is a multi-academy Trust working across the North of England. It has nine academy schools located in Yorkshire, the North West, and the North East. Consilium is dedicated to enriching lives and inspiring ambitions for both students and colleagues.

Curriculum

Art

  • Ms A Doran - Head of Expressive Arts
  • Miss F Cox - Teacher of Art

Art and Design at Moorside High School is part of the Expressive Arts Faculty and contributes to the school curriculum by providing a powerful and distinctive form of communication and expression. We are a creative and progressive department which is always looking for new and relevant ways of working, making excellent use of ICT and modern technologies.

At KS3 the study of Art and Design focuses on the development of technical skill and contextual understanding. Students practise art through a number of varied starting points, including themselves, their experiences, nature, and the manmade environment. They explore a full range of materials and approaches both 2D and 3D and build on skills and understanding acquired in Year 6.

The Art department is made up of two full-time Art and Design specialist. All staff work on common schemes of work with detailed schemes available for all KS3 and KS4 classes. Schemes of work build on progression and aim to equip students with the necessary skills and understand required when using art as a visual language to expressing oneself.

The Art department is a flourishing area of the school and at KS4 it is proven to be a popular and successful option. Currently, the department offers a GCSE-endorsed course and follows the QCA specification. It is our intention to offer a specialised 3D course in the coming year. 

The Art department strives to provide an extensive extra-curricular and enrichment programme by providing a wide range of exciting opportunities for students. We run regular gallery and museum visits, bring in outside agencies to offer workshops, and form links within the school and wider community.

To conclude, Art and Design contributes to the development of the whole person by providing opportunities for students to define themselves in relationship to others, their friends, social groups, and the culture in which they live.

Year 7

Facial Proportions

Hundertwasser Maps

Fantastic Fish

STARTING POINT:

Pencil study of an eye using guidelines. Face drawing exploring facial proportion.

Maps and the local environment. Students will use memory to recall the route they travel to school.

Observational studies of fish. How to recreate texture.

 

Facial proportions, techniques, expressive marks.

Students will explore symbolism and investigate how symbols are used to represent landmarks.

Embossing, texture, and stylising. Printing and Block printing.

VISUAL LANGUAGE:

In this project students will explore four different materials and experiment with different techniques: Watercolor paints, Felts, Oil pastel, Poster paints.

Map, patterns, and decoration.

4B pencils, rubbers

 

 

Scraffetto technique.

Poly print, printing ink paper (A3) rollers, and ink trays. Printing and repeat

MATERIALS/ PROCESSES:

For their finished piece, students will look at the work of Lichtenstein, Picasso, Modigliani, and Van Gogh. They will experiment with  technique of work and will recognise style. 

Pencils, colours, paints, brushes, A3 paper

Patterns.

 

 

Exploring different paint techniques.

Art Nouveau and Art Deco. Students will explore how fish have been use in these design movements. They will understand what stylising means

APPRECIATION.

 

Students will analyse the work of Hundertwasser and recognise the main characteristics.

 
       
       

YEAR 8

Man & Machine

Tim Burton Characters

Nature/Gaudi Bottles.

STARTING POINT:

What is form?

Exploring the work of Tim Burton.  Discussions about work. What are the main characteristics?

Observational drawing of natural forms. Students will explore a number of recording techniques. Explore the work of Gaudi

 

How do we create 3D effects?

Work through stages to invent own character.

 

 

Shapes shade — Students will explore using shading and tone to create 3D effects.

Genre fantasy/horror.

 

VISUAL LANGUAGE:

Shading, for graduation of tone and the effects of light will be explored in this project.

Line, expressive mark, crosshatch, and watercolor wash.

Observational studies, stylising nature, and decoration. Construction and 3D.

MATERIALS/ PROCESSES:

4B pencils, rubbers, colour pencils, shapes to shade templates, and examples of artists' work.

Biro pen, pencils, watercolour pallets, paper, and glue.

Pencils HB and 4B, rubber gum tape, silo type, masking tape, colour card tissue, string, paste, PVA glue.

 

Shading and Graduation of tone. Observational skills

Crosshatch shading and watercolour blending. Human proportions/distortions. Expressive marks and colours.

Students will construct a bottle influence by the work of Gaudi and their own observational studies.

APPRECIATION:

Students will look at the Art --Movements Futurism and Cubism and study how their work relies on tone and form.

Students will investigate the work of Tim Burton and explore his spontaneous style of drawing.

Students will investigate the work of Gaudi and recognise how his work has directly been influenced by nature.

Business Studies

NCFE Level 2 Certificate in Business and Enterprise

This qualification is designed for learners who want an introduction to business and enterprise that includes a vocational and hands-on element. It has been developed to enthuse and inspire learners about a career in business and enterprise. The qualification will appeal to learners who wish to either set up their own business, move into employment, or progress onto further study.

The assessment for the NCFE Level 2 Certificate in Business and Enterprise consists of 2 types of assessment:

  • Internal assessment — a portfolio of evidence. This will be graded by centre staff and externally moderated by NCFE
  • External assessment — assignment. This will be graded by NCFE.

Learners must be successful in both types of assessment to achieve the qualification.

  • Unit 01 Introduction to business and enterprise

This unit aims to give learners an introduction to business and enterprise. It provides learners with knowledge and understanding of start-up projects and helps them to identify risks and rewards.

  • Unit 02 Marketing for business and enterprise (external assessment)

This unit gives learners an insight into market research, and different marketing opportunities and techniques.

  • Unit 03 Finance for business and enterprise

This unit provides learners with knowledge and understanding of business finance for a new business or enterprise.

  • Unit 04 Plan, develop, and participate in a business or enterprise project

This unit allows learners to develop a project plan and implement the project. The learner will then go on to evaluate the overall success of the project. 

Computing

The Moorside Computing faculty strive to promote respect and opportunity for the students within the school. Our teachers combine specialist knowledge, enthusiasm, dedication, and high expectations of the students to achieve the highest standards across the whole ability range from Years 7 to 11.

  • Mr J Rooke — Head of Faculty
  • Mr C Bullen — Teacher of Computing

Overview

Computing is taught in purpose-built classrooms, each with 30 computers and an interactive whiteboard in each. We have a full-time specialist Computing teacher supported by a team of excellent technicians. Moorside continues to invest in Computing, ensuring the faculty has new resources, hardware, and software to match the requirements of the National Curriculum and provide opportunities that will allow our students to be well-prepared for the world of work in the 21st century.

Key Stage 3

Year 7

At Moorside, we understand every student comes to us with different backgrounds, skills, and abilities which is why our Year 7 ICT SOW focuses on developing functional skills at all levels. The importance of technology in our modern world cannot be understated and developing key skills early on allow students to succeed later on.

Alongside functional ICT skills, Year 7 learn the importance of E-Safety for our developing modern world.

Year 8

In Year 8 we begin to develop students' own interests in various computational topics ranging from Computer Hardware to Developing their own website. Each topic is designed to give students a broad scope to explore their own interests and develop skills they may have never considered before. By broadening their outlook we strive to ensure students reconceptualise the world they live in without sacrificing what makes them unique.

Year 9

In Year 9 students begin to consider their future options, as such our curriculum begins to focus on what students can expect from our two KS4 options, Computer Science and Creative iMedia. Students will learn the fundamentals of computer systems, team-based project development, and programming skills. The aim is to ensure all students understand the content of any future learning they might undertake while equipping those that do not choose a computer-based option with transferable skills to lead them into their future.

Key Stage 4 GCSE

At Key Stage 4, we are excited to offer a Computer Science option as well as a very popular option of Creative iMedia.

Useful links

Design and Technology

The faculty is made up of these areas:

  • Mrs P Crow — Head of Faculty and Teacher of Cooking & Nutrition and Hospitality & Catering
  • Mrs A Sargent – Assistant Head of Faculty and Teacher of Graphic Design and D&T
  • Mr P Hulley – Teacher of D&T and Engineering
  • Mr K Thomas — Teacher of D&T and Photography
  • Mrs C Vincent – Teacher of Textiles D&T Cooking & Nutrition

The Importance of Design and Technology

'Design and technology prepares students to participate in today's and tomorrow's rapidly changing technological world'

At Moorside High, we believe that through design and technology, all students become critical and informed users of products, designers, and innovators. Students learn to think and do something creative to improve the quality of life for consumers. Design and technology is about students becoming self-motivated, creative problem-solvers which allows them to work both as individuals and as members of a team. Throughout KS3 and KS4 students look for needs, wants, and opportunities while responding to them by developing a range of design ideas, by making and evaluating products and systems. In design and technology, students combine practical skills with an understanding of aesthetics, social issues, environmental issues, function, and industrial practices. Students consider the use and effects of present and past design and technology.

Design and Technology at Moorside High a Faculty Policy:

 The aim of the Design and Technology Faculty is to offer equal opportunities to all students. We achieve this by offering a broad, balanced curriculum, which allows students to achieve their maximum potential. Programmes of study are translated into differentiated schemes of work to match the ability, attitude, and developmental level of individual students.

We strive to stimulate a lasting interest in learning through problem-solving and technological activities. We help students develop their imaginations, sensitivity, and creative responses to a wide range of aesthetic experiences.

Technology has an important part to play in helping all students acquire the knowledge and skills needed for them to take an active role in an ever-changing world.

The study of technology fosters a wide range of desirable qualities. Students need to cooperate with one another and have a responsible attitude to health and safety. Students develop lively, enquiring minds, the ability to question and argue rationally and apply themselves to tasks and physical skills, both on their own and in groups.

As a faculty, we deliver high standards of academic achievement through designing, making, and evaluating results. We work together as an enthusiastic team and promote an environment where all students develop personal responsibility and self-motivation but consider the needs and achievements of others. Through problem-solving and technological activities, the students build up their skills and confidence to enable them to approach a man-made world as active participants in future developments. At the same time, they show care and sensitivity to the environment.

Goals

  • To give all students the opportunity and confidence to tackle and solve problems that are related to the needs of individuals.
  • To encourage students to question the world about them as well as being able to constructively evaluate their own and other people's work.
  • To create a learning environment where the attributes of creativity, equality, cooperation, and resourcefulness are developed and the students actively participate in project work.
  • To build on the different backgrounds of the individuals in a group and relate work to relevant cultural information.
  • For the students to develop an understanding of how they can control products and systems and how the products can be developed further to improve them.
  • To make students aware of the similarities and differences between school and the world of work

SMSC in Design & Technology

Spiritual, Moral, Social, and Cultural Education (SMSC) is an important part of every child's Design and Technology education. The social and moral aspects of materials, products, or food sources are a major part of the Design and Technology Curriculum. Students are encouraged to make discerning choices about the origins of manufacture and production. All design tasks have an SMSC element and also celebrate the learning and success of the students and staff. All year groups learn how to work in a democracy whereby all students have a voice

Spiritual Development

Students' spiritual development involves the growth of their sense of self, their unique potential, their understanding of their strengths and weaknesses, and their will to achieve. As their curiosity about themselves and their place in the world increases, they try to answer for themselves some of life's fundamental questions. They develop the knowledge, skills, understanding, qualities, and attitudes they need to foster their own inner lives and non-material wellbeing.

  • Explore creativity through product design
  • Explore emotions through design development
  • Reflection time to access own ideas
  • Use imagination in individual work and group work
  • Appreciation of beauty through the discovery of materials and design

Moral Development

Students' moral development involves students acquiring an understanding of the difference between right and wrong and of moral conflict, a concern for others, and the will to do what is right. They are able and willing to reflect on the consequences of their actions and learn how to forgive themselves and others. They develop the knowledge, skills, and understanding, qualities, and attitudes they need in order to make responsible moral decisions and act on them.

  • Encourage respect for others and their work
  • Work cooperatively
  • Encourage respect in a classroom environment
  • Encourage respect for equipment
  • Promote trust
  • Encourage sustainability through recycling and Upcycling

Social Development

Students' social development involves acquiring an understanding of the responsibilities and rights of being members of families and communities (local, national and global) and an ability to relate to others and to work with others for the common good. They display a sense of belonging and an increasing willingness to participate. They develop the knowledge, skills, understanding, qualities, and attitudes they need to make an active contribution to the democratic process in each of their communities.

  • Promote a sense of community
  • Encourage independence and self-respect
  • Celebrate success with displays and exhibitions
  • Encourage group/class discussion
  • Promote group work and accept roles within a group

Cultural Development

Students' cultural development involves students acquiring an understanding of cultural traditions and the ability to appreciate and respond to a variety of aesthetic experiences. They acquire a respect for their own culture and that of others, an interest in others' ways of doing things, and curiosity about differences. They develop the knowledge, skills, understanding, qualities, and attitudes they need to understand, appreciate and contribute to culture. 

  • Appreciate how culture influences design
  • Explore a range of materials and equipment used by different cultures
  • Gain inspiration through visiting exhibitions
  • Respect diversity of cultural values and beliefs

Design & Technology in KS3

Students in Y7 and Y8 are ability set where possible and will be given the opportunity to experience all areas of technology each year.

All KS3 students will:

  • Have one 100-minute lesson weekly or two 50-minute lessons
  • Work in all areas over the academic year, taking part in each area (Food, Product Design, Graphics, and Textiles).

Design & Technology in KS4

Three 50-minute lessons or one 50-minute lesson and one 100-minute lesson.

We offer a range of qualifications including GCSEs, Technical Awards, and V.Certs covering the following disciplines:

  • Graphic Design
  • Fashion & Textiles
  • Hospitality & Catering
  • Product Design / Craft
  • Health & Social Care

By offering a wide range of courses, it ensures that we can provide opportunities for all our learners' needs, for more information on each area please see the individual subject pages.

Graphic Design

Graphic Design enables students to design and make products with creativity and originality. Students will have the opportunity to use a range of workshop equipment from machines such as the Laser Cutter, Vacuum Former, and Strip Heater to tools such as a craft knife and glue gun.  Across Key Stage 3 students will be given the chance to test and work with a range of graphic and modeling materials and techniques.

Graphics in Year 7

In year 7, students will work through the design process to plan, design, and make their own products. Students will use Computer-Aided Design and materials such as card and plastic to produce their own Confectionery Boxes for the Mexican Festival, 'Day of the Dead'.

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Graphics in Year 8

In year 8, students will be given the opportunity to learn Photoshop; an industry-standard piece of design software. They will work through the design process to plan, design, and make their own products. Students will come up with a concept for their own music festival and will use materials such as card and aluminium to produce their own VIP Pass and Keyring for their festival.

Graphics in Year 9

In year 9, students will be given the opportunity to develop their skills on Photoshop; an industry-standard piece of design software. They will work through the design process to plan, design, and make their own products. Students will come up with a concept for their own movie and will produce their own poster and badge to successfully promote their film.

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KS4 Graphics

Students have the opportunity to choose from a number of qualifications within this subject, these include:

Eduqas GCSE Design & Technology

NCFE Technical Award in Graphic Design Level 2

More information about each qualification can be found below.

EDUQAS GCSE Design & Technology

The WJEC Eduqas GCSE in Design and Technology offers a unique opportunity in the curriculum for learners to identify and solve real problems by designing and making products or systems. Through studying GCSE Design and Technology, learners will be prepared to participate confidently and successfully in an increasingly technological world; and be aware of, and learn from, wider influences on design and technology, including historical, social/cultural, environmental, and economic factors. Learners will gain a breadth of knowledge across all areas of technology and will also be given the opportunity to specialise in either Graphic Design or Product Design.

This qualification is for the academically able.

Course Overview:

  • 50 per cent Coursework (NEA)
  • Approximately 35 Hours (100 marks)
  • Students will be required to cover the following Assessment Objectives: Investigation, Design & Make, Analyse, & Evaluate
  • 50 per cent Exam
  • 2-hour paper (100 marks)
  • Theory knowledge assessed

Course Content:

The specification enables learners to work creatively when designing and making and apply technical and practical expertise, in order to:

  • Demonstrate their understanding that all design and technological activity takes place within contexts that influence the outcomes of design practice
  • Develop realistic design proposals as a result of the exploration of design opportunities and users’ needs, wants, and values
  • Use imagination, experimentation, and combine ideas when designing
  • Develop the skills to critique and refine their own ideas while designing and making
  • Communicate their design ideas and decisions using different media and techniques, as appropriate for different audiences at key points in their designing
  • Develop decision-making skills, including the planning and organisation of time and resources when managing their own project work
  • Develop a broad knowledge of materials, components, and technologies and practical skills to develop high quality, imaginative, and functional prototypes
  • Be ambitious and open to explore and take design risks in order to stretch the development of design proposals, avoiding clichéd or stereotypical responses
  • Consider the costs, commercial viability, and marketing of products
  • Demonstrate safe working practices in design and technology
  • Use key design and technology terminology including those related to designing, innovation and communication; materials and technologies; making, manufacture and production; critiquing, values and ethics.

NCFE Technical Award in Graphic Design Level 2

Graphic design is a form of visual communication. It is the process by which visual information is given form and structure to communicate a message. Being a graphic designer is the profession of visual communication that combines images, words, and ideas to convey information to an audience. It involves designing print or electronic forms of visual information for advertisement, publication, or a website.

The NCFE Level 2 Technical Award in Graphic Design complements GCSE qualifications. It is aimed at 14-16-year-olds studying Key Stage 4 curriculum who are interested in any aspect of graphic design, including sourcing ideas and design. This qualification focuses on an applied study of the graphic design sector and learners will gain a broad understanding and knowledge of working in the sector.

Qualification purpose

  • Identify and experiment with graphic design components
  • Explore graphic designers, their work, and working in the industry
  • Work to graphic design briefs, refining, and selecting ideas
  • Form a graphic design portfolio and explore creative direction

Skills and Knowledge:

  • In using different tools and equipment competently
  • When experimenting with materials and techniques
  • In adapting their own ideas and responding to feedback
  • In evaluating their own work
  • That are essential for the modern workplace, such as team working; presentation skills; independent working; working to deadlines; efficient use of resources

Assessment:

In achieving this qualification, learners are required to successfully complete four units of work plus an externally assessed task-based exam. The externally assessed unit is a 10-hour exam which is worth 50 per cent of the overall grade. The other 50 per cent is made up of the following unit four units of work:

  • Unit 01 Introduction to Graphic Design — Internally and externally assessed Learners will develop an understanding of the components of graphic design. They will do this by working with physical and/or digital materials and techniques. The learner will be introduced to graphic design components through personal experimental work.
  • Unit 02 Graphic Design Practice — Internally and externally assessed. Learners will explore design disciplines, examine the work of recognised designers, and use their understanding of design components to identify successful design practice. They will choose one discipline, select some work by a recognised designer in that discipline and create their own piece of graphic design, taking inspiration from their research and using components found in the work of their chosen designer.
  • Unit 03 Responding to a Graphic Design brief — Internally and externally assessed. Learners will analyse the requirement of a graphic design brief. They will understand the requirements and develop some possible ideas to meet the brief. The learner will further develop an idea and present their final graphic design. Finally, the learner will analyse their work and review how they have met the brief.
  • Unit 04 Graphic Design portfolio — Internally assessed. Learners will explore working in the graphic design industry, by looking at different ways to present work to understand different types of portfolio. They will then design and create their own portfolio and review how the portfolio presents their skills as a graphic designer.

In order to achieve this qualification students must achieve at least a pass in every unit of work including the exam.

Fashion and Textiles

The Textile department will provide each learner with a creative experience that will develop key textile skills over the course of their study. In Key Stage 3 Learners will develop technical skills such as drawing, painting, and printing using a wide range of materials. Learners will be working in 2D and 3D both individually and collaboratively, studying textile designers from the past to the present to inspire and develop their work. The aim is to allow learners to develop their confidence, communication skills, and develop their imagination.

Students will produce a Powerpoint presentation, and sketchbook called a ‘look book’ full of drawings, ideas, and experiments as well as producing a large final outcome for each project. The project themes are vast, but each will aim to inspire, motivate and challenge all students, preparing them for any Art GCSE they wish to opt for.

Textiles in Year 7

In Year 7 students begin the school year by developing their knowledge of Textiles. Students will also work on a project focusing on a culture of their choosing. This project allows students to understand different cultures and beliefs, and they will design and make a pencil case based on their research. The project will give students the opportunity to experiment with different surface embellishment techniques and allow them to produce an individual product that reflects their theme.

Textiles in Year 8

In Year 8 students begin the school year by refreshing their knowledge of Textiles. Students will also work on a project focusing on “Graffiti-Art or Vandalism“. The project allows students to learn about the origins of Graffiti, and they will make a bespoke mobile phone holder based on the theme and the aesthetic. Students will also begin to consider how to promote their product and whether it has commercial viability.

Textiles in Year 9

In Year 9 students will start to investigate the subject area they would like to focus on for GCSE coursework and will build both their practical skills and theoretical knowledge in preparation for their GCSE.

Food and Nutrition

In Years 7 and 8 students study the principles and concepts of design and production in the context of food materials. Food & Nutrition teaches cooking skills and recipe development with emphasis on healthy eating, diet and nutrition, and the importance of making informed food choices. Special attention is given to health, safety, hygiene, and proper use of equipment. Through practical lessons and evaluating products, students learn to think critically and imaginatively and are able to use their skills to adapt and make their own products. This allows students to practically demonstrate their knowledge and creativity, making technology a subject in which students of all abilities can learn and achieve.

Year 7

Students develop a basic understanding of the nutritional requirements of a healthy diet through mainly practical sessions. Students learn basic food preparation techniques with a particular focus on fruit and vegetables. Students complete the 1-star chef award as an extended homework project.

Year 8

Students will learn how to cook a range of dishes safely and hygienically and to apply their knowledge of nutrition. In addition, they will consider the factors that affect food choice, food availability, and food waste. Emphasis within their work is upon diet and health. Students will complete the 2-Star Chef award as an extended homework project.

Hospitality & Catering in Year 9

Those students opting to carry on with Food & Nutrition will extend their First and Second Year work on the importance of nutrition and  in leading a healthy lifestyle. Students will also look at the prevention of food poisoning by looking at correct storage and preparation of food. Students will work on developing their practical skills further such as sauce making, curries, and pastry making. This will prepare them for further study at GCSE level.

KS3 'Let's get cooking' club

The club meets weekly after school until 4 pm, see Mrs Crow for information.

WJEC Hospitality & Catering Levels 1 & 2

The WJEC Level 1/2 Award in Hospitality and Catering has been designed to support learners in schools and colleges who want to learn about this vocational sector and the potential it can offer them for their careers or further study.

It is most suitable as a foundation for further study. This further study would provide learners with the opportunity to develop a range of specialist and general skills that would support their progression to employment.

Employment in hospitality and catering can range from waiting staff, receptionists, and catering assistants to chefs, hotel and bar managers, and food technologists in food manufacturing.

All of these roles require further education and training either through apprenticeships or further and higher education.

By studying Level 1 & 2 Hospitality and Catering learners will be able to:

  • Demonstrate effective and safe cooking skills by planning, preparing, and cooking a variety of food commodities while using different cooking techniques and equipment.
  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the functional properties and chemical characteristics of food as well as a sound knowledge of the nutritional content of food and drinks.
  • Understand the relationship between diet, nutrition and health, including the physiological and psychological effects of poor diet and health.
  • Understand the economic, environmental, ethical and socio-cultural influences on food availability, production processes, diet and health choices.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of functional and nutritional properties, sensory qualities and microbiological food safety considerations when preparing, processing, storing, cooking and serving food.
  • Understand and explore the Hospitality and Catering industry, the job roles and the different types of equipment used to support the industry.

Content Overview

Unit 1: The Hospitality and Catering Industry

40 per cent (90 Marks) are through assessment by an online written examination — 1 hour 30 minutes

Areas of content:

  • Understand the environment in which hospitality and catering providers operate Principles of nutrition.
  • Understand how hospitality and catering provisions operate.
  • Provision meets health and safety requirements Cooking and food preparation.
  • How food can cause ill health.
  • The hospitality and catering provision to meet specific requirements.

Unit 2: Hospitality and Catering in Action

  • 60 per cent Non-Examination assessment: internally assessed, externally moderated.
  • 9 hours which includes a 3 hours practical exam.
  • Practical exam is a two-course meal for two people with accompaniments.

Areas of Content:

  • The applied purpose of the unit is for learners to safely plan, prepare, cook and present nutritional dishes.
  • Propose four nutritional dishes for The Western Deli and Coffee Shop
  • Plan for the production of two dishes that could be included on the menu
  • Prepare, cook and present the two dishes that the apprentice will prepare and cook.

WJEC will set tasks for each assessment.

Examples below:

The business owner has employed a new catering manager together with a chef and three catering assistants who will support the kitchen and front of house. There are also plans to employ an apprentice from the local university.

The catering manager and chef want the menu to meet the diverse needs of the local people. They also want to rid the premises of the reputation for unhealthy food.

Grading

  • Level 1 Pass
  • Level 2 Pass
  • Level 2 Merit
  • Level 2 Distinction

Product Design and Craft

Product Design enables students to design and make products with creativity and originality. Students will have the opportunity to use a range of workshop equipment from machines such as the Fret Saw and Pillar Drill to hand tools such as a file or Tenon Saw. Across Key Stage 3, students will be given the chance to test and work with different materials and techniques.

Product Design in Year 7

In Year 7, students will be introduced to a variety of metal types and through designing and making a coat hook, they will learn how to work with mild steel and sheet acrylic and use such processes and cutting, filing, drilling, and finishing material.

Product Design in Year 8

In year 8, students will work through the design process to plan, design, and make their own products. Students will work with acrylic and use a range of machinery and hand tools to produce a ‘Shoe Storage’ product that can store small items and includes a mobile phone holder.

Product Design in Year 9

In year 9, students will be given the opportunity to work with a range of materials and equipment to help prepare them for GCSE level work. Students will work in the style of GCSE coursework and will build their capabilities to produce both practical and theory work of GCSE standard.

KS4 Product Design

Eduqas GCSE Design & Technology

The WJEC Eduqas GCSE in Design and Technology offers a unique opportunity in the curriculum for learners to identify and solve real problems by designing and making products or systems. Through studying GCSE Design and Technology, learners will be prepared to participate confidently and successfully in an increasingly technological world; and be aware of, and learn from, wider influences on design and technology, including historical, social/cultural, environmental and economic factors. Learners will gain a breadth of knowledge across all areas of technology and will also be given the opportunity to specialise in either Graphic Design or Product Design.

This qualification is for the academically able.

Course Overview:

  • 50 per cent coursework (NEA)
  • Approximately 35 Hours (100 marks)
  • Students will be required to cover the following Assessment Objectives:
  • Investigation, Design & Make, Analyse & Evaluate
  • 50 per cent exam
  • 2-hour paper (100 marks)
  • Theory knowledge assessed

Course Content

The specification enables learners to work creatively when designing and making and apply technical and practical expertise, in order to:

  • Demonstrate their understanding that all design and technological activity takes place within contexts that influence the outcomes of design practice
  • Develop realistic design proposals as a result of the exploration of design opportunities and users’ needs, wants, and values
  • Use imagination, experimentation and combine ideas when designing
  • Develop the skills to critique and refine their own ideas while designing and making
  • Communicate their design ideas and decisions using different media and techniques, as appropriate for different audiences at key points in their designing
  • Develop decision-making skills, including the planning and organisation of time and resources when managing their own project work
  • Develop a broad knowledge of materials, components, and technologies and practical skills to develop high quality, imaginative and functional prototypes
  • Be ambitious and open to explore and take design risks in order to stretch the development of design proposals, avoiding clichéd or stereotypical responses
  • Consider the costs, commercial viability, and marketing of products
  • Demonstrate safe working practices in design and technology
  • Use key design and technology terminology including those related to designing, innovation, and communication; materials and technologies; making, manufacture and production; critiquing, values and ethics.

Health and Social Care

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Drama

  • Miss A Lea — Assistant Head Teacher
  • Mrs K Ross — Head of Drama
  • Mr C Bebro — Teacher of Drama

In Drama, you will experience vibrant and exciting lessons delivered by teachers who are passionate about the Performing Arts.

There are plenty of opportunities to take part in extra-curricular activities, such as trips to the theatre, whole school productions, and lunchtime Drama club.

Moorside High School Drama department also provides wider opportunities for the students. Our students have previously taken part in the ‘Fearless project’ where they devised a play based on issues they felt were important in our area. This was performed in front of 10 other Salford Schools and a panel of judges at the AJ Bell stadium. Students have also worked closely with Salford University and an advocate for ‘Action for Sick Children’ to create a performance-based on a day in their lives. This was performed in front of NHS and University staff at Salford University — they were so pleased with it, they even invited us back to film it professionally.

 The Aims and Ethos of the Drama Department:

  • To encourage creativity, sensitivity & confidence in a supportive and nurturing manner
  • To gain an understanding of values, and build on life skills
  • To gain an understanding of dramatic skills and explorative strategies in order to create performances for an audience
  • To gain an appreciation of Drama and the theatre in a social and historical context

The Drama Department also seeks to:

  • Encourage professional artists to collaborate with Moorside students through Drama projects
  • Build on relationships with feeder primary schools and local colleges through Drama projects
  • Offer extensive extra-curricular activities including whole school productions and trips to the theatre

KS3 Drama Curriculum

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Year 7

The Haunted Lift

Live Performance

Romeo and Juliet

The Woman in Black

The Party

The Legend of the Sun God

Year 8

Darkwood Manor

Live Performance

The Tempest

Sparkleshark

Macbeth

The Mysterious Case of Joe

Year 9

Urban Legends

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time

Blood Brothers

Devising

Comedy

Live Performance

 

English

  • Mrs C Cooper - Head of Department
  • Mrs L Heppolette - Lead Teacher
  • Mrs L Preston - Lead Teacher
  • Miss Ghelichi - Lead teacher
  • Miss E Cole - Literacy co-ordinator
  • Miss C McFarlane - English Teacher
  • Mrs K Joyce - English Teacher
  • Mr T Roberts - English Teacher
  • Miss L Tallow - English Teacher
  • Miss H Mainwaring - English teacher
  • Mrs S Kirk - English Teacher

In English at Moorside High School, our overriding aim is to foster an appreciation and love of language and literature. We offer students the opportunity to explore, experience, and create all elements of the written and spoken form in order to equip them with highly refined skills and enthuse them about the subject.

We pride ourselves on being a subject that is full of variety. One day we may be exploring personal experience through writing a poem or composing a chapter of an autobiography. Another day we may be reading a challenging text whose rich and subtle language makes it ripe for exploration.

Then there are all the possibilities offered by drama: acting in a scene from a Shakespeare play or exploring a text through role-play.

We could be debating a current issue, writing our own speeches as well as listening to the views of others, or comparing and analysing the ways in which different sorts of newspapers cover the same story.

English involves all this and much more. It all requires energy, alertness, and imagination.

It may at times seem like hard work, but it should also be fun — at least some times.

English is important because it helps us develop as perceptive and appreciative readers. It also stretches our creative talents as imaginative writers with a confident grasp of language and technique.

It underpins work in most other school subjects and will continue to be important throughout life.

The English Faculty at Moorside High School is there to help you develop as successful readers and writers and, we hope, to let you enjoy yourselves at the same time.

What will I study?

Throughout Key Stage 3, we study Shakespeare, prose, poetry, drama, media, and spoken language within each year. We match our topics, novels, plays, and poetry clusters to the needs of our students and the year group. All topics studied during Key Stage 3 mirror the elements needed at Key Stage 4, so students are continuously developing skills they need for their GCSEs and beyond.

How will I study?

Students are taught in a variety of ways to meet and challenge the needs of all learners. English students are given the opportunities to explore, investigate, and assess all elements of the English Language with increasing depth as they move through the school. They are equipped with the skills to do this in groups, on their own, and to make the best use of new technologies.

How will I be monitored and assessed?

Units of work are assessed regularly during the topic by the teacher using classwork and homework. We then formalise the assessments by building key pieces into all units which are also standardised. In addition to this, we have compulsory assessed homework built into all Key Stage 3 schemes which again allows us to tailor the material to the student’s needs. Targets are set on entry and progress towards targets measured after each assessment. Intervention will be undertaken where necessary to support students. Students also have opportunities to assess and to feedback on their own and each other’s work.

English Support Sessions for students

The following support sessions are available for students to attend:

After School

Monday Year 9

Tuesday Year 10

Wednesday Year 7 & Year 8

Geography

  • Mrs S. Leadbeater (Head of Geography)

As one of the English Baccalaureate subjects, Geography gives students a foothold into many areas which are currently of vital importance and provides future career opportunities such as how to control the increasing flooding problem in the UK and how to successfully manage migration-related issues among many others.

It is a pleasure to watch students develop their naturally curious nature into developed decision-makers, able to ask relevant questions and undertake the detailed research required to come to justified conclusions.

  • Miss K. Birnie (Teacher of Geography)

I wanted to become a Geography teacher because I enjoy learning about new places and cultures. The subject also considers real problems which we will face for generations to come. I’d like to inspire students to become interested in the environment and be the solution to the problems we face.

  • Miss M. Connolly (Teacher of Geography)

The reason why I wanted to be a geography teacher was because I wanted young people to make sense of the crazy world around us. I want young people to be amazed by our wonderful Earth and have a positive, enjoyable experience with the subject. It was important to me that I could make young people aware of different cultures, vast populations, and energy crisis, which can be linked it to the ever-changing physical environment. It is crucial that our young people have a good understanding of and interest in the world, in order to change it for the better.

Our Aims

Our aim is to encourage the development of independent skills, including the use of more modern learning platforms such as GIS and GPS. We want students to develop a sense of responsibility for the world around them and give them the confidence to acknowledge that they can contribute on a daily basis in many different ways to the world they live in.

What will I study?

Year 7 — About the UK, Africa, Rivers, Urbanisation, and Coasts.

Year 8 — Weather and climate, Asia, Tectonics, Earning a living, and Resource management

How will I study?

Each unit at KS3 is designed to develop students but also to create a sound basis for progress at GCSE level. This includes studying the topics named above, but also the skills required from map skills and map reading, graph work, and photographic interpretation to extended writing skills.

How will I be monitored and assessed?

Across Key Stage 3 students regularly complete deep case study assessments where they are asked to apply what they have learned to real places and real events in a range of locations around the world. Before completing these tasks students have the opportunity to plan and undertake independent research with the aid of student-friendly level descriptors.

Having completed assessed tasks students play an active role in their own assessment identifying areas that went well and areas in need of improvement (known as what went well? And even better if?)

Why take Geography as an option?

Geography is a diverse discipline that can lead to a myriad of career opportunities from logistics to emergency management. Geography is widely viewed as a broad-based academic and rigorous subject and therefore has proven levels of above-average graduate employability.

Learning Outside the Classroom (LOTC)

Geography is a subject that lends itself well to fieldwork and we undertake a number of national and international visits. These have included trips to Formby, Malham, Skipton, North Wales, Canada, Italy, and New York. Future trips are advertised to students throughout the year and on the school website. 

History

Mr J Powell (Head of Department)

I am passionate about teaching History at Moorside High School because our students have a real love of learning, and they appreciate the importance that History plays in both their education and in the world around them. I love challenging students to investigate historical issues such as the crimes of Jack the Ripper and the Assassination of President John F Kennedy and then watching them formulate their own interpretations of these events.

Miss R Boyle

I chose to teach History because it is such an interesting, relevant, and important subject. I love teaching at Moorside as our students are always eager to investigate new historical topics and eras. My favourite topics in History are the World Wars, Jack the Ripper, and the Industrial Revolution. I enjoy teaching the Industrial Revolution as we are able to investigate Salford’s History and its development throughout time.

Mrs E McGivern

I feel that the study of our past is vital in order to understand what is going on in the present. I have a passion for History and love finding new ways to make History as fun and interesting as possible for my students.

Mr M Fanning

I’ve always loved history because it is a fascinating subject that is so relevant to the world we live in today. I have always thought that we cannot understand the present without first understanding the past, and that is an attitude I try to help our students to have as well. History has so many opportunities for students to really get into who they are and where they come from, and to question and challenge that too!”

Our aims

In History at Moorside High School we aim to seize the opportunity to refresh and re-invigorate thinking and to inspire and engage learners in our twenty-first-century learning environment. The department's mission is to inspire and motivate students in their investigation of historical events and individuals. We aim to empower students to develop their own identities, and to respect each other through their study of History at personal, local, national, and international levels.

The History Department aims to make the study of History relevant and engaging to its students to foster independent learning in order to encourage confident and thoughtful young people to take an interest in the world around them.

What will I study?

Year 7 — Students develop the key skills required to be a successful historian, topics covered include: a local History study, the Roman Empire, Medieval Realms, and Tudor times. Year 8 — Students build upon the key skills introduced in Year 7 to investigate: the era of the Stuarts, the English Civil War, the British Empire, the Industrial Revolution, the crimes of Jack the Ripper, the Suffragettes, and the sinking of the Titanic. Year 9 — Students utilise and extend the key skills introduced in Years 7 and 8 to analyse the outbreak of the First World War, the Battle of the Somme, the policy of appeasement, the rise of Hitler, life on the British home front during the Second World War, the holocaust, the use of atomic weapons, the Cold War, the 1960s and the assassination of JFK.

How will I study?

The key skills and concepts required to be successful at Key Stage 4 (GCSE) are firmly embedded and practiced in the Key Stage 3 History curriculum. A variety of teaching and learning methods are adopted including interactive whiteboard activities, role-plays, the use of Ipads, group and paired activities, and independent research projects.

How will I be monitored and assessed?

Across Key Stage 3 students regularly complete Assessment for Learning tasks which relate directly to the specific assessed tasks that they are required to complete each half-term. Before completing assessed tasks students study a student-friendly success criteria, which enables students to select the relevant features which they will include in their work.

Having completed assessed tasks students will play an active role in peer assessment, where they will refer to the success criteria to select examples of (www) what went well) and ebi (even better if).

Why take History as an option?

The study of History lets you develop skills that could lead to many career choices. History is widely regarded as a rigorous and challenging qualification by employers and education providers and is popular for all areas of development. As well as a broad range of historical and contemporary contextual knowledge, history develops skills of interpretation and analysis useful in all jobs, including high-flying professional careers like politics, law, and the media.

History links well with all subjects, but particularly Humanities subjects such as English, Religious Education, Law, Philosophy and forms an important part of the English Baccalaureate.

Some examples of careers History can lead to are:

Accountancy, Archaeology, Architecture, Barrister, Broadcasting, Civil Service, Diplomatic Service, Drama Theatre and the Performing Arts, Media, Teaching, Public Relations, Journalism, Legal Executive, Police, Politics, Publishing, Sales and Marketing, Solicitor, Tourism, Town Planning, TV Researchers, Lawyers.

What will happen at Key Stage 4?

Key Stage 4 History follows the WJEC Eduqas GCSE (9-1) in HISTORY

 Component 1: Studies in Depth

  • The Elizabethan Age, 1558-1603
  • The Development of The USA 1929-2000 

Component 2: Studies in Breadth

  • A study of Germany in Transition 1919-1939
  • Changes in Crime and Punishment in Britain, c.500 to the present day

KS3 Homework

Students of KS3 will be set a revision homework from their knowledge organisers every week. They will then sit a short history quiz of seven questions following the lesson. Students have been given a knowledge organiser at the beginning of each topic. If they lose it, they are expected to print it off themselves.

Learning outside the classroom

Key stage 3 students will take part in a visit to the First World War Battlefield’s in July 2019 — students will retrace the steps taken by the Salford Pals at the Somme and will take part in the last post ceremony at the Menin Gate.

Year 10 History students visit London in June 2018- the trip will include a tour of Wembley Stadium, a chance to retrace the steps of Jack the Ripper through Whitechapel, take a trip on the London Eye and visit the Natural History Museum.

Useful websites

The websites below can be used by students, parents, and carers to support their understanding of Historical issues.

 BBC Bitesize offers revision support for the GCSE unit focusing upon Germany in Transition

https://www.bbc.com/education/guides/zw3hk7h/revision

For support focusing upon the GCSE Elizabethan unit

https://www.bbc.com/education/topics/z3w89qt

Help with homework

http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/

An informative site for general research, which gives a good overview of the key figures and periods that are studied at Key Stages 3 and 4.

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/

Useful for revision notes, quizzes, and resources for things covered throughout secondary education.

http://www.schoolhistory.co.uk/

Literacy

Click here to access Accelerated Reader.

Click here for the Parent's Diagnostic Report Guide for Accelerated Reader.

Click here to find out how to access BorrowBox for downloadable books.

General Reading List

Title

Author

The Diabolic 

S. J. Kincaid 

 A Monster Calls (Movie Tie-in)

 Patrick Ness 

 Reckless I: The Petrified Flesh

 Cornelia Funke

 The Deviants

 C. J. Skuse 

 The Fever Code

 James Dashner

 The Penalty

 Mal Peet

 North Face

 Matt Dickinson

 Terror Kid

 Benjamin Zephaniah

 Dread Eagle

 Alex Woolf

Messenger of Fear

Michael Grant 

The Crossover

Kwame Alexander 

The Hunted

Charlie Higson

ZOM-B Baby

Darren Shan 

 Hostage Three

Nick Lake 

Dead Ends

Erin Jade Lange

Divergent

Veronica Roth

Road of the Dead

Kevin Brooks

Fahrenheit 451

Ray Bradbury

The Maze Runner (The Maze Runner, Book 1)  

 James Dashner

The Haunting of Jessop Rise

Danny Weston

Light

Michael Grant

Zero Hour 

Will Hill

The Haunting of Jessop Rise

Danny Weston

Wonderboy

Nicole Burstein

The Reluctant Journal of Henry K. Larsen 

Susin Nielsen

 

Mathematics

  • Miss J Lloyd   Director Of Mathematics and Assistant Head Teacher
  • Mrs N Mackle   Head of Faculty
  • Mrs Crookall  Second in Maths
  • Mrs K Sommerville Lead teacher
  • Mr A Gillmon Teacher of Mathematics and Assistant head Teacher
  • Miss L Sykes  Teacher of Mathematics
  • Mr J Pinches  Teacher of Mathematics
  • Mr P Robinson  Teacher of Mathematics
  • Mr Birchall Teacher of Mathematics
  • Mr Rothwell  Teacher of Mathematics
  • Mrs E Abram Teacher of Mathematics
  • Mr P Jennings   Teacher of Mathematics

The Mathematics Faculty At Moorside High School Aims To:

  • To place the child at the centre of learning.
  • To set challenging targets with high expectations for all students and encourage a sense of pride in their performance and behaviour.
  • To deliver a variety of approaches to teaching and learning to engage and motivate students and demand their active participation.
  • To provide opportunities for the application of Mathematics to real-life problems and links and importance to other subjects.
  • To provide an appreciation of the importance and relevance of Mathematics in the world of work.
  • To ensure the smooth transition for students between Key Stages and ensure progression in teaching and learning throughout their time at Moorside High School.
  • To explore enrichment opportunities outside the curriculum to enhance students’ enjoyment of mathematics.
  • To continually improve the standards of achievement in Mathematics at Moorside High School.

The Mathematics Faculty Objectives:

  • To perform basic numeracy skills.
  • To perform the basic mathematical skills needed in his/her chosen career or for entry to higher or further mathematical education.
  • To understand the mathematics likely to be encountered in daily adult life.
  • To reason clearly and logically, and to set out a rational argument.
  • To approach problems systematically, choosing appropriate techniques for their solution.
  • To follow logical instructions clearly expressed.
  • To experience satisfaction in and enjoyment of his/her mathematical achievements.
  • To obtain any formal mathematical qualifications needed for his/her chosen career.
  • To obtain his/her best possible results throughout their school career.

The Programme of study for Key Stage 3 and attainment targets (National Curriculum) and Programme of study for Key Stage 4 (National Curriculum) provide the foundation for the schemes of work in Mathematics. The programmes outline a detailed philosophy, which underpins teaching and learning in Mathematics:

“Mathematical thinking is important for all members of modern society as a habit of mind for its use in the workplace, business and finance; and for personal decision-making. Mathematics is fundamental to national prosperity in providing tools for understanding science, engineering, technology, and economics. It is essential in public decision-making and for participation in the knowledge economy.”

“Mathematics equips students with uniquely powerful ways to describe, analyse and change the world. It can stimulate moments of pleasure and wonder for all students when they solve a problem for the first time, discover a more elegant solution, or notice hidden connections. Students who are functional in mathematics and financially capable are able to think independently in applied and abstract ways, and can reason, solve problems and assess risk.”

“Mathematics is a creative discipline. The language of mathematics is international. The subject transcends cultural boundaries and its importance is universally recognised. Mathematics has developed over time as a means of solving problems and also for its own sake.”

Students are expected to develop:

  • Representing
  • Analysing
  • Interpreting and Evaluating
  • Communication and Reflecting.
  • Range and content
  • Number and Algebra
  • Geometry and Measures
  • Statistics

Key Stage 3 Curriculum

All students follow a personalised route through Mathematics and are grouped with students of similar ability with consideration given to entry-level in year 7/prior attainment and potential for achievement. This is regularly reviewed and adjusted accordingly. At Moorside, we follow a mastery approach to the National Curriculum objectives. The main aim is that we teach for depth of understanding over breadth of content.

Students take short unit tests, alongside an end-of-half-term test. And a formal end-of-year exam.

In year 9 students begin preparation towards their GCSE examination.

For in-depth information on the Mastery approach click here.

For in-depth information on the Mastery approach click here.

Key Stage 4

The Maths Department currently follows the AQA GCSE scheme of work. Students commence their Mathematics GCSE course in Year 9 and sit the examination in year 11.  All students follow a course in Mathematics appropriate to their ability and needs.

Students working at each level can expect to achieve the following grades:

Higher Grades 9-5

Foundation Grades 5-1

Please note that due to recent curriculum changes, the higher tier examination paper is made up of 50 per cent grades 7-9 and therefore Students who would have historically been entered for the higher tier will now perform better on the foundation paper.

Equipment

Students are expected to abide by the school expectations for equipment however we also expect that students will have their own scientific calculator.

Useful Websites

Useful websites for mathematics can be found below:

Modern Foreign Languages

  • Mrs L Millington  - Head of Modern Foreign Languages
  • Mrs K Carroll - Lead Teacher for Modern Foreign Languages and Second in Faculty
  • Mrs D Woods – Deputy Head / French and Spanish Teacher
  • Miss C Doran – French and Spanish Teacher
  • Mr R Robinson - French and Spanish Teacher
  • Mr J Ryan - French and Spanish Teacher

Faculty Ethos

We aim to make language learning an exciting and vibrant experience for our students through the use of game, song, and group activities. We are thorough in our approach to the teaching of grammar and translation as we are intent on giving our students the tools needed to independently develop their language skills. We aim to impart our own passion for language and foreign culture onto our students and hope that they will leave us with the skills and knowledge necessary to get by in our multicultural world.

Key Stage 3

Most students in KS3 will study either French or Spanish. When choosing options in Year 9, students who have an aptitude or an interest in languages will be encouraged to continue with the language they have been studying through to GCSE. Through learning language, students will also broaden their knowledge of foreign culture and will have the chance to take part in cultural celebrations such as Cinco de Mayo and Bastille Day.

Key Stage 3

 

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

French

Spanish

French

Spanish

French

Spanish

Module 1 La rentrée

Module 1 Mi vida

 Module 1 Vive les vacances!

Module 1 Mis vacaciones

 Module 1 Ma vie social d’ado

 Module 1 Somos así

Module 2 En class

Module 2 Mi tiempo libre

 Module 2 J’adore les fetes!

Module 2 Todo sobre mi vida

 Module 2 Bien dans sa peau

 Module 2 Oriéntate

Module 3 Mon temps libre

Module 3 Mi insti

 Module 3 A loisir

Module 3 A comer

 Module 3 A l’horizon

 Module 3 En forma

Module 4 Ma vie de famille

Module 4 Mi familia y mis amigos

 Module 4 Le monde est petit

Module 4 ¿Qué hacemos?

 Module 4 Spécial vacances

 Module 4 Jóvenes en acción

Module 5 En ville

Module 5 Mi ciudad

 Module 5 Le sport en direct

Module 5 Operación verano

 Module 5 Moi dans la monde

 Module 5 Una aventura en Madrid

Key Stage 4: Assessment

KS4 French

KS4 Spanish

   

Number

Module

Number

Module

   

Module 1

Qui suis-je?

Module 1

Desconéctate

   

Module 2

Le temps des loisirs

Module 2

Mi vida en el insti

   

Module 3

Jours ordinaires, jours de fête

Module 3

Mi gente

   

Module 4

De la ville à la campagne

Module 4

Intereses e influencias

   

Module 5

Le grand large…

Module 5

Ciudades

   

Module 6

Au collège

Module 6

De costumbre

   

Module 7

Bon travail!

Module 7

A currar

   

Module 8

Un oeil sur le monde

Module 8

Hacia un mundo major

   

 

Music

The Music department at Moorside High strives to develop the students as people.  This is achieved by bringing the students into contact with the fundamental activities of listening, appraising, performing, and composing.  These activities are interdependent and interrelated in a well-balanced curriculum that emphasises the practical and creative aspects through a structured and progressive course.

Mrs H. Wylie — Head of Music

Aims of the department

  • Develop students’ knowledge, skills, and understanding through the integration of performing, composing, and listening.
  • Allow participation, collaboration, and working with other Musicians.
  • Adapt to different Musical roles and respect the values and benefits others bring to Musical learning.
  • Develop students' understanding of Musical traditions and the part Music plays in national and global cultures and in personal identity.
  • Explore how ideas, experiences, and emotions are conveyed in a range of Music from different times and cultures.
  • Encourage students to engage with and analyse music, enabling them to develop views and justify opinions.
  • Give students the opportunity to experience a wide range of musical contexts and styles to allow them to make informed judgements.
  • Explore ways Music can be combined with other Art forms and other subject areas.
  • Explore how thoughts, feelings, ideas, and emotions can be expressed through Music.

The Music department strives to provide opportunities for all students to:

  • Develop individual performance skills, both vocal and instrumental.
  • Develop listening and aural perception skills in practical activities, including composing and performing.
  • Develop creative and composition skills, including songwriting, arranging, and improvisation.
  • Work with a range of Musicians and watch and listen to live musical performances.
  • Work individually, in groups, and as a class.
  • Build upon their own interests and skills, taking on different roles and responsibilities in their development of Music leadership skills.
  • Make links between Music and other subject areas of the curriculum.

Extra-Curricular

The Music department has extremely strong links with the Drama and Art department and these come together to produce excellent school productions that allow the students to gain experience of working with others and performing in front of large audiences.

The Music department annually puts on a successful Moorside’s Got Talent show. The whole school gets behind the contest, supporting their friends and their year group with full force. All years were fully represented in each round, and it was great to have the whole school come together for this key event for the Music department. There are even bigger plans to beat the success of Moorside’s Got Talent for this academic year!

The students are also given the opportunity to work within the local and wider community. In previous years, Key Stage 4 students were given the opportunity to work with Professor Stephen Davismoon at Salford University to create Music that commemorated the Salford Pals involvement at the Battle of the Somme. In this upcoming academic year, Key Stage 3 students will receive the opportunity to work with the Hallé Orchestra within their Adopt-a-Player scheme that will work closely with several of our local primaries alongside our students. This will culminate in a final performance later in the year.

Within the Music department there are opportunities for students to become involved in the following:

  • Expressive Arts productions — Moorside’s Got Talent and Grease
  • Whole School Choir
  • Year 7 Choir
  • Expressive Arts Ambassadors
  • Street Band

Music at KS3 and KS4

  • KS3 students take usic for one 50-minute lesson per week.
  • KS4 students currently study Music for three 50 minute lessons per week.
  • Students in KS4 opt to study GCSE Music, and they follow the Eduqas specification.
  • Instrumental students are entered for the ABRSM and Rock School graded examinations throughout the year through their lessons with the MAPAS staff.

Key Stage 3 Music Overview

Topics covered throughout the year

Half Term

Year 7

Year 8

1

Year 7’s Got Talent

Keyboard Skills

2

Keyboard Skills

Musical Contexts - Band Carousel

3

Understanding and using chords

Songwriting

4

Moorside & Me

Film Music

5

Around the World in 6 Lessons

BBC Ten Pieces

6

BBC Ten Pieces

Introduction to Music Technology

Physical Education

  • Mr D Higham - Head of PE Faculty
  • Mrs J Jackson - Second in Faculty
  • Mr S. Laverty - Teacher of PE
  • Miss K Aitken - Teacher of PE
  • Mrs S. Kirk- Teacher of PE
  • Mrs J. Whealing - Teacher of PE

Department Ethos

It is a deeply held belief of the Department that Physical Education has a unique contribution to the development of each individual through the physical, emotional, moral, and social development within a school. We give opportunities for students to experience new and existing activities where they can take responsibility for their own and other students’ learning. In addition to physical skills and promoting a healthy lifestyle, the subject also develops social skills including inter and intrapersonal skills, teamwork, empathy, motivation, and leadership. These opportunities are developed both in and outside the classroom through the implementation of extra-curricular clubs that cater to both the competition element through teams and well-being through social activities.

What the students will study

Key Stage 3 and 4

All students undertake a broad programme of Physical Education.

Activities for boys include Athletics, Badminton, Basketball, Cricket, Cross Country, Football, Gymnastics, Handball, Health & Fitness, Hockey, Rugby, Softball, Table Tennis, and Volleyball,

Activities for girls include: Aerobics, Athletics, Cross-Country, Dance, Football, Gymnastics, Health & Fitness, Hockey, Netball, Rounders, Rugby, and Volleyball

The Department also offers a strong programme of Extra-Curricular Activities.

GCSE Physical Education

Students who choose to undertake GCSE PE as an option will have an additional three lessons per week. The theory lessons are usually classroom-based but sometimes it is possible to teach a particular aspect in a practical session in the gym.

Students should be well aware that GCSE Physical Education involves rigorous academic study as well as all-around sporting ability. Students who enter for it must be able to demonstrate competence in three activity areas, two of which must be individual physical activities and one team/ individual activity or 2 team activities. In GCSE PE a variety of sports are covered, although choice is still limited by such factors as the school curriculum, staffing, etc. Attendance at PE clubs is an integral part of the course, and it is advised that GCSE P.E. is suited to students who already take part in such clubs.

For more information see the PE GCSE page.

NCFE level 2 in Health and Fitness

As well as offering GCSE PE we are now offering an NCFE Level 2 in Health and fitness. This qualification a prerequisite of the Level 3 Health and Fitness course that is offered at local colleges. The course is designed for learners with an interest in any of the health and fitness contexts such as exercise, lifestyles, and diet. Level 2 is appropriate for learners who are looking to develop a significant core of knowledge and understanding, and want to apply that knowledge in preparing, planning and developing a health and fitness programme.

For more information see the Health & Fitness V Cert page.

PE Kit and Expectations

Please note- We do not allow canvas-based footwear for PE lessons.

All PE kits must be clearly marked with the student’s name.

It is the expectation that all students will bring their full PE kit to every lesson. Students will only be excused from practical lessons for an injury which is accompanied by a note from parents/carers in their school planner or a medical note. Students will still be expected to bring kit despite not being able to take part, as they can participate in a non-physical capacity such as referee, scorekeeper, etc. Please note the Department will not accept notes for illness, e.g. cold/flu, as we expect students to participate as they do in other curriculum areas.

Failure to bring in the correct kit will result in a 30-minute detention that same evening, a text will be sent out informing parents/careers of this.

Extra-Curricular: Clubs After School

 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Sports Hall

Trampolining Dance GCSE Revision

Fixtures

Netball Years 7&8

Netball Years 9, 10, 11

Basketball

Astro

Football Years 9, 10, 11

Fixtures

Girls Football

Football Years 7&8

 

Field

Girls Football Rugby

Fixtures

     

PE Classroom

GCSE Revision

 

Cambridge National Revision

   

Dance/Studio

   

Dance

Climbing Club

 
           

Extra-Curricular Clubs: Lunchtime

 

 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Sports Hall

Netball

Table Tennis

Badminton

Handball/Netball

Trampolining

Astro

Football

Football

Football

Football

Football

PE Classroom

   

GCSE PE

   

Gym

     

Gym Club

 

 

 

 

   

Science

  • Mr P Greenhalgh – Director of Science
  • Mrs K. Roberts – Assistant Head of Science
  • Mr A Prescott – Lead Teacher of Science
  • Miss S Cloke – Lead Teacher of Science
  • Mrs G Hancock – Lead Teacher of Science
  • Mr N Dawson – Teacher of Science  & Duke of Edinburgh Coordinator
  • Dr R Martin - Teacher of Science & Assistant Head Teacher
  • Mr A Harrison - Teacher of Science
  • Mr D Towey - Teacher of Science
  • Mr A. Varden - Teacher of Science
  • Mr C. Howard – Science Technician

Science lessons are always practical-based where possible to capture the imagination of students. The Key Stage 3 course runs over 2 years and Key Stage 4 course runs over 3 years. Students will be continually assessed internally at Key Stage 3 through written assignments and test papers and both internally and externally at Key Stage 4. This data is used to move students to the appropriate classes and assess whether the student is on the right course. Homework is given weekly via a variety of methods such as research and past exam questions. There are revision classes that take place after school for students who have exams approaching. These are also drop-in sessions that are available for any students to attend if they are struggling with their work or feel that they need extra help.

Key Stage 3 Science

The Key Stage 3 Science course runs over two years. The table below shows the topic content covered across both years. KS3 Part 1 relates to year 7 and KS3 Part 2 relates to year 8. Throughout the course, students will be assessed via written extended questions and will also sit an exam paper each half-term. Each topic area includes a required practical that students complete to develop key skills that may be tested on GCSE papers now that the coursework element has been removed.

Key Stage 3 Science

 

Year 7 Set 1 and 2

Year 7 Set 3 and 4

Year 8 Set 1 and 2

Year 8 Set 3 and 4

Half Term 1

Introduction to Science Waves

Introduction to Science Waves

Introduction to Science Reactions

Introduction to Science Genes

Half Term 2

Elements  Matter

Matter Elements

Genes  Energy

Energy Reactions

Half Term 3

Forces  Genes

Genes   Forces

Organisms

Organisms

Half Term 4

Organisms

Reactions

Ecosystems Electromagnets

Electromagnets Ecosystems

Half Term 5

Types of energy Ecosystems

Ecosystems  

Types of Energy

Forces Communicable Diseases

Communicable Diseases Forces

Half Term 6

Electricity and potential difference Chemical Reactions

Organisms  Electricity and potential difference

Separating techniques Waves   Earth

Waves Earth   Separating techniques

Key Stage 4 Science

The Key Stage 4 course runs over three years with all external examinations sat during the GCSE exam period at the end of year 11.

Throughout the three-year course, students will be assessed via extended written questions, end-of-unit tests, and mock examination papers. There are required practicals that take place throughout the different topics which focus on key practical skills. These are examined at the end of year 11 as a replacement for the coursework component.

Key Stage 4 Science

Examination Paper

Topics Included

Length of Paper

Biology Paper 1

Cell Biology, Organisation, Infection and response, Bioenergetics

Combined: 1 hour 15 minutes Triple: 1 hour 45 minutes

Biology Paper 2

Homeostasis and response, Inheritance, Variation, and evolution, Ecology  

Combined: 1 hour 15 minutes Triple: 1 hour 45 minutes

Chemistry Paper 1

Atomic structure and the periodic table, Bonding, structure, and properties of matter, Quantitive chemistry, Chemical changes, Energy changes

Combined: 1 hour 15 minutes Triple: 1 hour 45 minutes

Chemistry Paper 2

Rate and extent of chemical change, Organic chemistry, Chemical analysis, Chemistry of the atmosphere, Using resources

Combined: 1 hour 15 minutes Triple: 1 hour 45 minutes

Physics Paper 1

Energy, Electricity, Particle model of matter, Atomic Structure

Combined: 1 hour 15 minutes Triple: 1 hour 45 minutes

Physics Paper 2

Forces, Waves, Magnetism and electromagnetism, TRIPLE ONLY: Space Physics

Combined: 1 hour 15 minutes Triple: 1 hour 45 minutes

Travel and Tourism

This qualification aims to:

Provide learners with the opportunity to develop sector-specific knowledge and skills in a practical learning environment.

Learners will develop:

  • Knowledge that underpins the effective use of skills, processes and attitudes in the sector such as the appeal of different tourist destinations to different types of customer, and the factors that influence travel and tourism
  • Skills such as researching different travel and tourism organisations, the features of tourist destinations, and the products and services available to meet the needs of different customers
  • Attitudes that are considered to be very important in the travel and tourism sector, including how to develop tourism while respecting the environment and local communities

This Award complements the learning in GCSE programmes such as GCSE Geography and GCSE Business by broadening learners’ experience and skills participation in different contexts, with the opportunity for them to practically apply their knowledge and skills through project work such as investigating different travel and tourism organisations, how they identify trends and customer needs to provide products and services, the factors influencing tourism, and the impact of tourism on destinations.

Achieving this qualification

This qualification, which is 120 GLH, is the same size and level as a GCSE. It is ideal if you are a working at level 1 or level 2 and would like to find out more about the importance of travel and tourism to the UK and world economies, and to build the skills and knowledge to progress to further learning. The qualification provides an engaging and stimulating introduction to the world of travel and tourism. This qualification includes both UK and international tourism, and allows you to explore current issues affecting global travel and tourism organisations and destinations. It also includes topics such as destination management and relationships between organisations, as well as social and ethical responsibilities/sustainability. You will explore some key areas within the sector, including: the contribution of travel and tourism to the UK economy; tourism development; trends in travel and tourism; how organisations meet customer needs; the location and appeal of different types of travel and tourism destinations; and the impact of travel and tourism on the local community, environment and economy. You will also prepare a holiday plan to meet customer needs, understand the different factors that influence global travel and tourism, and learn how travel and tourism organisations and destinations respond to these factors.

Assessment

Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 Tech Award in Travel and Tourism

  • Travel and Tourism Organisations and Destinations (GLH) 36 (Level) ½ (Assessment) Internal
  • Influences on Global Travel and Tourism (GLH) 48 (Level) ½ (Assessment) External
  • Customer Needs in Travel and Tourism (GLH) 36 (Level) ½ (Assessment) Internal Synoptic

The qualification consists of three components that will give you the opportunity to develop broad knowledge and understanding of the travel and tourism sector. Components 1 and 3 are assessed by your school through tasks or assignments. Your teacher will mark these, and so you will receive feedback as to how you are getting on. The assessment for Component 2 covers the different factors that influence global travel and tourism and is sent away to be marked. Component 3 builds directly on Components 1 and 2, and brings your learning together, using the knowledge, skills and techniques you have developed about travel and tourism organisations, features of destinations, types of visitors, travel, holidays and accommodation, factors influencing travel and tourism, how organisations respond to these factors, and managing tourism through sustainability and destination management, in a specific context. All the work that you do throughout the course, including the tasks or assignments, will prepare you for this final task.

The three components focus on the assessment of knowledge, skills and practices. These are all essential to developing a basis for progression and, therefore, learners need to achieve all components in order to achieve the qualification.

Sign Posts

Study of the qualification as part of Key Stage 4 learning will help learners to make more informed choices for further learning either generally or in this sector. The choices that learners can make post-16 will depend on their overall level of attainment and their performance in the qualification. Learners who generally achieve at Level 2 across their Key Stage 4 learning might consider progression to:

  • A Levels as preparation for entry to higher education in a range of subjects
  • Study of a vocational qualification at Level 3, such as a BTEC National in Travel and Tourism, which prepares learners to enter employment or apprenticeships, or to move on to higher education by studying a degree in the tourism sector

Learners who generally achieve at Level 1 across their Key Stage 4 learning might consider progression to:

  • Study at Level 2 post-16 in a range of technical routes designed to lead to work, to progression to employment, to apprenticeships or to further study at Level 3. For these learners, the attitudes and the reflective and communication skills covered in this qualification will help them achieve.
  • Study of travel and tourism post-16 through the study of a Technical Certificate. Learners who perform strongly in this qualification compared to their overall performance should strongly consider this progression route as it can lead ultimately to employment in the travel and tourism sector.

Art, Photography, and Textiles — KS4

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Drama — KS4

The GCSE Drama course encourages students to develop a personal interest in why Drama matters and be inspired, moved and challenged by studying a broad, coherent, worthwhile and satisfying course of study. Students will work collaboratively in groups with their peers as well as having time to think personally and independently. They will constructively evaluate their own work and the work of others and develop skills in teamwork, communication, reflection and practical techniques.

The GCSE Drama course will develop a firm basis for the student’s future role as active citizens in employment and society in general as well as for the possible further study of Drama.

The Course Structure

The course is divided into three parts:

Unit 1: Drama Exploration

In this unit the students will engage in a programme of work that will help them appreciate how a variety of drama activities can be used to deepen their understanding of the drams form. They will explore a theme, topic or issue. Students will write a Documentary Response of no more than 2000 words, reflecting on and evaluating the work completed in the unit.

Unit 2: Exploring Play Texts

This unit introduces students to plays written for the Theatre. They will learn how to interpret a play in various ways and understand how a play works in performance. They will complete a Documentary Response of no more than 1000 words reflecting and evaluating the work completed in the unit. During this unit students also get the opportunity to experience a live performance of a play. They will then write a response to this live performance which will be no more than 2000 words.

Unit 3: Drama Performance

The end of the course sees students demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of practical drama skills through the creation of a piece of live performance. They can show their skills as a performer or as performance support. This unit is externally assessed and all students present their work to an Edexcel Examiner.

Assessment

GCSE Level Examination

Written Documentary Response 25 per cent

Practical Exploration Work 35 per cent

Examined Performance 40 per cent

Computing — KS4

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Computer Science — KS4

The aim of the Computer Science course is to equip learners with a knowledge and understanding of the fundamental principles and concepts of the subject, including the computational thinking skills to analyse problems and design solutions across a range of contexts.

The Course Structure

Unit 1: Principles of computer science

Written paper 2 hours, 90 marks, 75 per cent

This unit introduces candidates to computer science; they will gain an understanding of what algorithms are, what they are used for and how they work. They will gain knowledge of binary representation, data storage and compressions and the ability to use SQL to insert, amend and extract data stored in a structured database. They will use HTML and CSS to construct webpages. They will learn to read and interpret fragments of assembly code. They will also gain an awareness of emerging trends in computing technologies.

Unit 2: Practical programming

Controlled assessment, 50 marks, 25 per cent

This is a practical ‘making task’ that enables students to demonstrate their computational techniques using a programming language. Students will decompose problems into sub-problems, create original algorithms and design, write, test and evaluate programs

Changes from 2020 to 2022

Unit 2 will see changes made form 2020 onwards, with the second theory based paper being replaced with a Online Programming assessment. The weighting of this will remain at 50 per cent but puts more of a focus on practical skills requiring in depth understanding of challenging and complex programming.

Creative iMedia — KS4

Creative and Digital Media Level 1/2 Cambridge National Certificate plays an important part in many areas of our everyday lives and is also an important part of the UK economy. There is a demand from employers for an increasingly skilled and technically literate workforce as more and more media products are produced digitally. Creative iMedia provides students with specific and transferable skills and a solid foundation in understanding and applying this subject, whether it is in employment or higher education.

Course Structure

Unit1: R081: Pre-production skills

This unit will enable learners to understand pre-production skills used in the creative and digital media sector. It will develop their understanding of the client brief, time frames, deadlines and preparation techniques that form part of the planning and creation process.

Unit 2: R082: Creating digital graphics

The aim of this unit is for learners to understand the basics of digital graphics editing for the creative and digital media sector. They will learn where and why digital graphics are used and what techniques are involved in their creation.

Unit 3: R085: Web Design

This unit will enable learners to understand the basics of website creation. It will enable them to interpret a client brief, use planning and preparation techniques and to create their own website using digital techniques.

Unit 4: R090: Digital Photography

This unit enables learners to understand the basics of Digital Photography for the creative and digital media sector. Learners will be able to plan a Digital Photography to a client brief, use cameras to take photographs and be able to store, export and review the final product.

Assessment

Unit 1 R081: Pre-production skills, Written paper 1 hour 15 mins — 60 marks

Unit 2 R082: Creating digital graphics hours, controlled assessment — 60 marks

Unit 3 R085: Web Design, controlled assessment — 60 marks

Unit 4: R090: Digital Photography, controlled assessment — 60 marks

Potential Careers in:

  • Marketing
  • Media production
  • Public relations

Technology — KS4

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Performing Arts — KS4

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Humanities — KS4

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PE and Dance — KS4

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Core Subjects — KS4

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Modern Foreign Languages — KS4

Information pending.

Health and Fitness — KS4

The NCFE V-Cert in Health and Fitness (level 2) is designed for students who are interested in any aspect of Health and Fitness industry and is designed to provide students with the skills, knowledge and understanding of the applied study of good health and fitness practices and an understanding of working in the sector

What will I be studying?

Throughout the course students will:

Gain an understanding of the benefits of fitness

Learn the functions of the main body systems

Learn the benefits of a healthy balanced diet and how it affects lifestyles

Prepare, plan and develop a personal health and fitness programmes

The students wanting to take NCFE Health and Fitness must have a passion for fitness and exercise and enjoy researching and creating their own exercise plans.

Assessment

To be awarded the NCFE Level 2 Certificate in Health and Fitness, learners are required to successfully complete four mandatory units:

Unit 1 - Principles of health and fitness - Internally assessed portfolio of evidence

Unit 2 - Healthy lifestyles - Internally assessed portfolio of evidence

Unit 3 - Preparing and planning for health and fitness - Externally set and marked assessment paper

Unit 4 - Develop a personal health and fitness programme - Internally assessed portfolio of evidence

To achieve the NCFE Level 2 Certificate in Health and Fitness, learners must successfully demonstrate their achievement of all learning outcomes and assessment criteria of the units.

Post 16 Opportunities

As a result of completing the NCFE Health and Fitness course students could progress onto A-Level in Physical Education, Diploma in Exercise and Health and Fitness Studies. It will also be useful to students who wish to go on and study qualifications in Sport, Nutrition and exercise. Further vocational courses could lead to jobs in recreational management, performance analysis, sports science, leisure management, education, physiotherapy etc.

Photography — KS4

Throughout this course, students will learn the necessary technical skills required to successfully take photographs and produce a photographic series. Students shall also discuss how ideas, feelings and meanings are conveyed and interpreted in images, artefacts and products in their chosen area(s) of study and consider the historical and contemporary developments and different styles and genres in relation to Photography.

At GCSE, students are expected to expand on their learning of Photography at year 9 through extended research and photographic practice. Students are expected to respond to artist briefs, linking and comparing their own work to that of existing artists and photographers. They will also discuss how images, artefacts and products relate to social, historical, vocational and cultural contexts, along with a variety of approaches, methods and intentions of contemporary and historical artists, craftspeople and photographers.

There is a greater emphasis on independent learning and time management, and students are expected to evidence their research and testing of ideas throughout the course , logging this information within their portfolio.

60 per cent Coursework:

Three independent projects that include:

  • Research
  • Testing various photographic processes and techniques
  • Developing and recording ideas
  • Continually reflecting upon and evaluating own practice

40 per cent Exam:

  • 10 hour controlled photographic assessment
  • Choice of photographic briefs to choose and respond to
  • Set by examiner

Course Content

Skills and Techniques

Students will be expected to demonstrate skills and techniques in the context of their chosen area(s) of study within the use of photography: lens-based and light-based media as follows:

  • the ability to explore formal elements of visual language; line, form, colour, tone, pattern, texture, in the context of lens-based and light-based media investigating different ways of working as appropriate to their chosen area (s) of study
  • responding to an issue, theme, concept or idea, or working to a design brief
  • showing in their work the use of viewpoint, composition, focus control, depth of field, movement and narrative
  • using appropriate techniques, technologies and equipment for recording images and lighting subjects within their chosen area
  • showing an understanding of the developing, printing, manipulation and production qualities of still and moving images where appropriate understanding the value of working individually and as a member of a team within their chosen area
  • providing evidence of the use of safe working practices

Knowledge and Understanding

Students must show a knowledge and understanding of:

  • how ideas, feelings and meanings are conveyed and interpreted in images, artefacts and products in their chosen area(s) of study in Photography: lens-based and light-based media
  • historical and contemporary developments and different styles and genres in relation to Photography: lens-based and light-based media •how images, artefacts and products relate to social, historical, vocational and cultural contexts
  • a variety of approaches, methods and intentions of contemporary and historical artists, craftspeople and designers from different cultures and their contribution to continuity and change in society within their chosen area(s) of study in Photography: lens-based and light-based media
  • a working vocabulary and knowledge of specialist terms relevant to their chosen area(s) of study within Photography: lens-based and light-based media

Career Opportunities

  • Commercial Photographer
  • Portrait and Events Photographer
  • Fashion Photographer
  • Documentary and Journalism Photographer
  • Artist

Fine Art — KS4

This course develops skills in creative thinking and problem solving and generates self-motivated, independent learners. The course is structured to enable students to confidently develop their own ideas with guidance and support. Students are introduced in lessons to a variety of experiences, exploring a range of fine art media, techniques and processes. This includes traditional fine art practices and new technologies. They will explore images and resources from the past and recent times to inspire their own work. Students investigate drawing for different purposes and use sketchbooks to support their work. Students are required to work in one or more areas of fine art and may explore overlapping areas:

  • Painting and drawing
  • Mixed media including collage and assemblage
  • Sculpture
  • Printmaking
  • Lens-based media and new technology

Students will be expected to demonstrate skills and techniques and use different approaches to recording images from observation and imagination. They must show knowledge and an understanding of how feelings and meanings are conveyed in images by other artists and how they relate to social and historical context. They must develop a working vocabulary of specialist terms within fine art. In order to explore different themes in art students are encouraged to discuss images in lessons and annotate their work with their own opinions. Homework is set regularly and builds upon the skills and knowledge gained in lessons. A successful coursework portfolio is a result of effort and hard work. Students are encouraged to attend after-school lessons to help them produce high-quality work.

UNIT 1- Portfolio of work (60 per cent)

Students will complete a minimum of 2 in-depth projects as part of their portfolio of work which should be thoughtfully presented and meet the four assessment objectives. The work should demonstrate their ability to sustain work from an initial starting point to the realisation of intentions and include evidence of their research.

UNIT 2 - Externally set task (40 per cent - this begins in January in year 11)

Students will receive an examination paper from the exam board which is discussed in lessons with the class teacher. Each student will select a question as a starting point within the paper and develop their work in accordance with the assessment objectives. They will work in a similar way to how they have produced their portfolio of work. This work will take place in lessons and will culminate in a ten-hour examination in which students produce a personal response to their exam question which will then be marked by the centre and checked by an external moderator.

Assessment

  • GCSE Level Examination
  • Coursework 60 per cent
  • Examination 40 per cent

GCSE PE

GCSE Physical Education will stimulate and enthuse students who have a keen interest in health and fitness. It will promote a love of learning on how the body functions as well as creating an interest and appreciation of the benefits of keeping fit and healthy.  Students will also examine new areas such as sport psychology, biomechanical processes and socio-cultural influences. 

Practical

The practical element is assessed in three different sports as a performer.  These three performances must include one individual and one team performance, the third is from either category.  There is a definitive list of sports set by the examination board.  The practical element also consists of a written assessment task where the student demonstrates their knowledge of a chosen sport, analysing a performance and suggesting corrective measures to aid improvement.

Theory

Unit 1: The human body and movement in physical activity and sport 

  • Applied anatomy and physiology: The skeleton, muscular, cardiovascular and respiratory systems and the effects of exercise 
  • Movement analysis: Levers, planes and axes 
  • Physical training: Components of fitness, fitness testing, types of training, safety principles and the training season
  • Use of data: Types of data, analysis using charts and graphs

Unit 2: Socio-cultural influences and well-being in physical activity and sport 

  • Sport psychology: Classification of skills, motivation, personality types, goal and target setting, guidance, feedback, information processing model, arousal, preparation techniques and aggression
  • Socio-cultural influences: Participation, commercialisation, sport and media, sponsorship, technology, players conduct, prohibited substances and spectator behaviour
  • Health, fitness and well-being: Benefits of exercise, consequences of a sedentary lifestyle, somatotypes, obesity and nutrition
  • Use of data: Types of data, analysis using charts and graphs  

Students wanting to take GCSE Physical Education need to have a passion for sport; enjoy performing practically and be interested in the science behind their performances. Please note that students must take part in at least one sport outside of school at competitive level.

Assessment

Practical

NEA (Non-exam assessment): Practical performance in three different physical activities in the role of player/performer (one in a team activity, one in an individual activity and a third in either a team or in an individual activity). Analysis and evaluation of performance to bring about improvement in one activity.  The NEA is worth 40per cent of the total marks.

Theory

Paper 1: Unit 1 - 1 hour 15-minute written examination worth 30per cent of the total marks.

Paper 2: Unit 2 - 1 hour 15-minute written examination worth 30per cent of the total marks

Post 16 Opportunities

Post GCSE, students may choose to continue onto A Level Physical Education or take up courses in sports science, sports and leisure or coaching. Further vocational courses could lead to jobs in recreational management, performance analysis, sports science, leisure management, education, physiotherapy etc.

GCSE Dance

The Dance GCSE course is suitable for students who have an interest or passion for Dance. GCSE Dance is a fresh and vibrant specification which includes popular performance and choreography, alongside a diverse and accessible professional works to engage and inspire students. All 3 stands of performance, composition and appreciation have been introduced to students at Key Stage 3. At GCSE they build in complexity and are developed further.

What will I be studying?

During the GCSE Dance course, students will study three key components: 

  • Performing: Students will develop their own personal performance through improving physical, technical and expressive skills. Students will perform a choreographed and set solo as well as a group performance.
  • Composing: Students will learn how to choreograph and create their own dances. Students will work on producing creative and original movement material.
  • Appreciating: Students will learn how to describe, interpret and evaluate both their own and professional dance work. Students will study a number of professional works in a range of dance styles such as; Contemporary, Hip Hop, inclusive dance and site-specific performance.

The students wanting to take GCSE Dance need to have a passion for dance, enjoy performing and enjoy been creative and imaginative.

Assessment

Practical:

Performance

  • Set phrases through a solo performance (approximately one minute in duration).
  • Duet/trio performance (minutes in a dance, which is a maximum of five minutes in duration).
  • 30 per cent of GCSE - Non-exam assessment (NEA) marked by the centre and moderated by AQA

Choreography

  • Solo or group choreography – a solo (two to two and a half minutes) or a group dance for two to five dancers (three to three and a half minutes).
  • 30 per cent of GCSE - Non-exam assessment (NEA) marked by the centre and moderated by AQA

Theory:

  • Dance appreciation
  • Knowledge and understanding of choreographic processes and performing skills.
  • Critical appreciation of own work.
  • Critical appreciation of professional works.
  • 40 per cent of GCSE - Written exam:1 Hour 30 Minutes

Post 16 Opportunities

AS and A-level Dance are both offered at Sixth Form under the same exam board – AQA. The GCSE course leads nicely into AS and A-Level Dance similar skills are built upon and the complexity of the practical work increases. However, this course offers much more. It will create imaginative, creative, expressive, confident young people, all skills that will be transferable in the world of work and life. There are many possible careers within the Dance industry that GCSE Dance can prepare students for.: Performer, choreographer, teacher, dance journalist, dance movement therapist, dance filmmaker, dance project coordinator, dance press and public relations officer, costume/set designer and dance photographer.

Music – KS4

Develop their own musical interests and skills including the ability to make music individually and in groups and to use

music technology.

  • Evaluate their own and others’ music
  • Understand and appreciate a range of different kinds of music.
  • Actively engage in the process of music study in order to develop as effective and independent learners and as critical and reflective thinkers with enquiring minds

Assessment

GCSE Level Examination

Unit 1: Listening to and Appraising Music

Examination: Written paper - 1 hour (20 per cent)

Unit 2: Composing and Appraising Music

Externally assessed (20 per cent)

Unit 3: Performing Music

Controlled Assessment, 1 group and 1 solo (40 per cent)

Unit 4: Composing Music

Controlled Assessment (20 per cent)

General Information

GCSE Music helps students to develop subject knowledge, understanding and skills through listening to a variety of music, playing music and creating their own music.

The specification places a strong weighting on practical aspects of music (60per cent), with choices catering for a wide range of interests and abilities. This four unit GCSE assesses students’ skills in listening and appraising, composing and performing music.

Why Choose Music?

GCSE Music offers a solid foundation for progression to other music studies, including A Level Music and often to a music-related career. Our course provides the opportunity for students to develop valuable transferrable skills such as self-confidence, concentration, creativity, evaluation and team work.

Teachers and students enjoy and appreciate the benefits of being involved in playing, making and understanding music. Students have the opportunity to gain self-confidence by performing to others, develop social and team working skills and exercise their creativity while engaging in activities which they enjoy.

Course content

There are four units in GCSE Music and students must complete them all. They learn about musical language and explore the elements underlying the organisation of sound through listening to music, performing individually and in a group, composing and appraising music.

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